Wednesday, November 13, 2019

The gatekeepers of thought

I have to admit I don’t follow hockey. If I’m honest I’ll tell you that hockey doesn’t really interest me. However, when I saw that one of hockey’s longest-running commentators had been fired over something he said, I had to know why.

Up until recently Don Cherry was an 85-year-old hockey commentator on ‘Hockey Night in Canada,’ a sports program on Sportsnet. The network issued a statement saying Cherry “made divisive remarks that do not represent our values and what we stand for.” His partner on the show, Ron MacLean, went even further writing, “Don made comments that were hurtful and prejudiced.” I had to know what he said.

Don Cherry
I read the quote, frowned, scratched my head, then tried to dissect the statement in order to ascertain what was so offensive. This is what he said. “You people that come here, whatever it is—you love our way of life, you love our milk and honey, at least you can pay a couple bucks for a poppy or something like that. These guys paid for your way of life that you enjoy in Canada. These guys paid the biggest price.”

I knew he was talking about immigrants so I thought it might be the poppy part. Was that offensive to Middle Easterners since heroin comes from the opium poppy grown in the Middle East and Asia? No, I was way off. The poppy that Cherry was referring to is a tradition started by the Brits dating back to the first World War. The tradition is to wear a poppy in remembrance of those who died in war. That comes from the poem “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae who was a lieutenant colonel in the Canadian Expeditionary Forces. He had just lost a friend in the battle of Flanders, Belgium. On the bloody battlefield thousands of bright red poppies appeared among the carnage. McCrae was so touched by the scene that he memorialized it in verse.

Remembrance Day is observed in the UK and Canada. It’s much like our Memorial Day and falls on our own Veterans Day. A deeper dive into Don Cherry’s remarks reveals he was lamenting the fact that fewer and fewer people are wearing the poppy on Remembrance Day. “Very few people wear the poppy,” he said in the same conversation that got him fired. “Downtown Toronto, forget it. Nobody wears the poppy. Now you go to the small cities. You people that come here, whatever it is—you love our way of life. You love our milk and honey. At least you can pay a couple bucks for a poppy or something like that. These guys paid for your way of life that you enjoy in Canada. These guys paid the biggest price for that.”

Okay, I still wasn’t getting it, although I had my suspicions. But that couldn’t be it. Ross Perot was chastised for that way back in 1992 when he spoke to a black group and was forced to apologize. Then I saw a CNN story. That was it. Don Cherry’s horrible offense was he used the term “you people.” OMG.

I’ve spoken to dozens of groups. Women’s groups, black groups, Hispanic groups. I’m almost positive I’ve used “you people” in the course of my speech. “You people do great work” or “You people know exactly what I’m talking about.” We use that term when we’re not part of that group. Oh, but you can’t say that…anymore. It’s offensive.


It’s offensive only to the dim-witted or the speech police. And I don’t know which one’s more dangerous.


Phil Valentine is the host of the award-winning talk radio show, 
The Phil Valentine Showon SuperTalk 99.7WTN in Nashville. He's also co-host of The PodGOATs podcast.





Wednesday, November 6, 2019

It's time to declare war

I have long advocated that we declare war on drug cartels and gangs. We should be sending these animals to Gitmo now that Obama has emptied it out. If you sat there as I did and watched coverage of the nine American women and children who were butchered by a drug cartel in Mexico you’re probably nodding in agreement. If you’re waiting for the Mexican government to do something about it you’re going to be waiting a long time.

Mexico is a corruptocracy. Yes, that’s my word for it, but it accurately sums it up. Mexico is run by the drug cartels. That’s why the government there has done very little to stem the flow of illegals into this country. The liberals will tell you these are people doing the jobs Americans just won’t do. I will tell you the truth. The truth is we have no way of knowing who’s good and who’s bad. That’s what border checkpoints are for. We have them at every airport. You can’t enter this country without first being checked by a border agent. Why in the world is the Southern border any different? It’s not.

What we just saw in Mexico happens here with regularity. In 2014 a drug cartel hitman confessed to killing 40 people, mostly in California, for hire. There have been beheadings in Arizona, countless gang killings in LA. As much as we like to think this is something that just happens south of the border, it’s here. And it’s been here. And it’s getting worse.

Our open border policy has blurred the lines between a civil society and barbarians. Did you see the way Mexican police cowered in the presence of El Chapo’s son recently? These people are scared to death of the drug cartels, and we should be, too. The only way we’re going to survive is to wipe these people off the face of the earth as we’ve done with ISIS.

It’s almost comical how the hysteria has been over Turkey’s incursions across their border into Syria, but these same people don’t give a damn about the invasion into our own country. Think what you will about the Kurds, we’re abandoning our own people in border towns across the Southwest and in big cities and small hamlets across our own country.

We don’t need a war on drugs. We need a war on drug cartels. And I don’t mean a figurative war or a rhetorical war. I mean bombs. I mean strafing. I mean everything short of boots on the ground. If the Mexican government’s not going to clean up the problem, we should.

We also need the military all across our southern border. A wall would be nice, but it doesn’t look like Congress is going to give Trump the funding anytime soon. He doesn’t need Congress’s approval to put troops on the border.

President Trump has warned us that most of the drugs coming into this country from Mexico aren’t coming through the checkpoints. The idiots at the Washington Post and other mainstream media outlets pointed to a Border Patrol report that chronicled the large amounts of drugs being caught at border checkpoints in order to prove him wrong. What they fail to see is the Border Patrol can only report what they catch.


The Border Patrol seizes under 3 tons of heroin per year. Americans use around 22 tons of heroin a year. Where do these people think the rest is coming in from? It’s coming across our open border from drug cartels south of it. And it’s time we did something about it.


Phil Valentine is the host of the award-winning talk radio show, 
The Phil Valentine Showon SuperTalk 99.7WTN in Nashville. He's also co-host of The PodGOATs podcast.